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Apnea changes with seasons?
http://www.freecpapadvice.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3595
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Author:  Daniel Gagner [ Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:12 pm ]
Post subject:  Apnea changes with seasons?

I noticed that as the fall wore on and we're almost into winter that my AHI readings started to creep up. I had been getting an AHI of 1 or less most nights. Lately though the AHI has been hovering around 2.5 and as high as 4. Now, I still feel good so I'm not concerned, just curious.

Does anyone know if seasonal conditions can attribute to this? Cooler rooms. I run a pellet stove. It's very lean fuel but I'm sure there's residual stuff in the air from it. Maybe winter post nasal drip? Anyone else notice any changes over time?

I've tried tweaking my pressures a bit but it doesn't seem to make any difference.

Author:  Pugsy [ Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:10 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

What category of that AHI seems to be creeping up?

Are you maybe waking more during the night for some reason or other?

Are you using a heated hose?

How's the water consumption going in the humidifier? The only thing I might think of in terms of seasonal would be the pellet stove maybe drying out the humidity in the house a bit and that in turn maybe causing a bit of nasal congestion which in turn maybe the machine is sensing nasal stuff and giving it an apnea flag....it's all a big stretch though and not common.
My AHI doesn't really change from season to season but the humidity needs might impact the nasal mucosa which can cause congestion and the machine might make a mistake and flag something that was actually in the nose. Very similar to the false flags we get when we have a bad cold or flu or upper respiratory infection of some sort.

Author:  BillyHW [ Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:28 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Another user once suggested that the reason for a creeping up AHI could be that as you are getting used to the CPAP and it starts working, you shift to sleeping on your back more than you were doing before. But when you are on your back you may need a higher pressure, but you may have not changed the settings on your machine to go higher. Hence the creeping up AHI.

It makes logical sense to me.

Before CPAP I had pretty much completely stopped sleeping on my back. I'm only now starting to get comfortable with sometimes sleeping on my back again.

The changing seasons does mean a drastic change in humidity levels where I live, but I'm not sure how this would directly affect AHI. Maybe the discomfort caused by low humidity is contributing somehow to AHI, but I'm not sure how exactly.

Also possibly allergens in some seasons are causing some swelling in the nasal passages that could be contributing to a higher AHI, but I'm just speculating there.

Author:  Daniel Gagner [ Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:52 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Pugsy wrote:
What category of that AHI seems to be creeping up?

Are you maybe waking more during the night for some reason or other?

Are you using a heated hose?

How's the water consumption going in the humidifier? The only thing I might think of in terms of seasonal would be the pellet stove maybe drying out the humidity in the house a bit and that in turn maybe causing a bit of nasal congestion which in turn maybe the machine is sensing nasal stuff and giving it an apnea flag....it's all a big stretch though and not common.
My AHI doesn't really change from season to season but the humidity needs might impact the nasal mucosa which can cause congestion and the machine might make a mistake and flag something that was actually in the nose. Very similar to the false flags we get when we have a bad cold or flu or upper respiratory infection of some sort.



Thanks for the response. I don't wake up at all during the nights. I have the respironics with the heated hose and the adaptive humidity setting on. I don't use much water in the tray over time but I have humidifiers on in the house with a gauge and the humidity is a constant 45-50 which as I understand it is optimal for humans. I am a bit more sniffly in the winter but no congestion at all. As I said, I'm fine with the numbers I'm getting; just curious as why they're different. I'll be interested in seeing if they change again in the spring.

Author:  Sleep2snore [ Sun Nov 26, 2017 1:58 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Maybe try with adaptive humidity off and put it on manual with a little more humidity. It might work, but if it doesn't there is no harm done.
I know the Adaptive humidity should cope, but others have said when heating goes on it needs to be on manual.
I can't comment on that, it is just what others have said, my humidifier is always on Manual as I like the humidity.

Author:  Daniel Gagner [ Sun Nov 26, 2017 2:22 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Sleep2snore wrote:
Maybe try with adaptive humidity off and put it on manual with a little more humidity. It might work, but if it doesn't there is no harm done.
I know the Adaptive humidity should cope, but others have said when heating goes on it needs to be on manual.
I can't comment on that, it is just what others have said, my humidifier is always on Manual as I like the humidity.



Thanks, I shall give that a try tonight...

Author:  Chunkyfrog [ Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:47 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Are seasonal allergies an issue?
Even if mild, they could be a factor.

Author:  Daniel Gagner [ Mon Dec 04, 2017 5:21 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

Chunkyfrog wrote:
Are seasonal allergies an issue?
Even if mild, they could be a factor.


It would seem that seasonal allergies might be the issue.

Years ago my doctor recommended flonase as I had a post nasal drip in the winter. Probably caused by being shut in in enclosed spaces during the winter with heating systems going, less humidity, more dust in the air, etc. At that time he recommended it because a post nasal drip in the back of the throat could damage vocal cords over time. The reason for the raspy voices in some older people. I took it for awhile but stopped.

So, Flonase is over the counter now instead of prescription. I've been taking it for about a week and my AHI numbers have dropped from the 3.5-4.5 range down to the 1.0-2.0 range. It looks like I'll take it through the winter.

For those thinking they might have the same issues. Flonase is a mild steroid, different from the steroids we usually think of. It's not a nasal spray that's habit forming and doesn't seem to have any other physiological issues. Some people do report dry nostrils and a few report headaches though. But it doesn't have that list of warning often associated with some other medications.

Maybe someone will relate to this are seek relief.

Author:  LSAT [ Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:55 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Apnea changes with seasons?

I have been using my machine gfor 9 years and have not noticed any changes by season. My AHI stays in the same range and my average pressure stays relatively stable. I have no allergies.

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